Weekly Breach Roundup

The Latest Anonymous Attack.; Missing Laptop Affects Patients
Weekly Breach Roundup

In this week's breach roundup, hacktivist group Anonymous says it has leaked 1.76 GB of data from the Department of Justice. Also, a missing laptop potentially exposes information on 17,000 intensive care patients.

Anonymous Hacks Justice Dept. Database

The hacktivist group Anonymous says it has stolen 1.76 GB of data from a United States Bureau of Justice Statistics server and posted it online for download. According to a posting on AnonNews.org, an independent news platform for Anonymous, the hacking collective was able to obtain internal e-mails and the "entire database dump." A spokesperson confirmed that the Department of Justice is looking into the unauthorized access to a website server operated by the Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Missing Laptop Affects 17,000

Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center in Baton Rouge, La. is reporting a breach affecting 17,130 patients stemming from a missing unencrypted laptop. The laptop, which contained information on intensive care unit patients, went missing sometime between March 16 and March 20. "The data stored on the laptop computer was being used for a project that required the collection of certain quality and patient outcomes data and covered ... patients in the adult ICU from 2000 to 2008," the statement explained. Information on the laptop included patient name, age, race, dates of admission and discharge and results of treatment.

3,600 Notified of Insider Breach

An employee at Massachusetts Eye and Ear has been suspended for inappropriately using names, Social Security numbers and dates of birth of patients. The organization reports that it's aware of four individuals whose personal information was actually misused. It's offering 3,600 patients whose Social Security numbers were available to the former employee one year of free credit monitoring.

Hospital Employee Loses Laptop on Trip

An employee of Boston Children's Hospital lost an unencrypted laptop while at a conference in Buenos Aires, according to the Boston Globe. The laptop contained information on approximately 2,100 patients, including names, dates of birth, diagnoses and treatment information.


About the Author

Jeffrey Roman

Jeffrey Roman

News Writer, ISMG

Roman is the former News Writer for Information Security Media Group. Having worked for multiple publications at The College of New Jersey, including the College's newspaper "The Signal" and alumni magazine, Roman has experience in journalism, copy editing and communications.




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